Using Others’ Talents to Accomplish Your

Team building is a delicate and time-consuming process. Anyone can put together a group of talented people, but it takes a dedicated team leader to bring everyone together effectively.  One of the most important considerations you must make is whether or not an applicant fits into your company’s culture.  The right person will build upon what you’ve created, but the wrong person can bring it all down very quickly – and culture can take an awfully long time to rebuild.

Learn to conduct the orchestra.

In the following series of lines from Aaron Sorkin’s already famous screenplay, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak holds the following dialogue with Jobs:

Wozniak: You can’t write code, you’re not an engineer, you’re not a designer, and you can’t put a hammer to a nail … So how come 10 times in a day, I read “Steve Jobs is a genius.” What do you do?

Jobs: I play the orchestra.

Jobs knew he could never have accomplished what he did alone. He needed engineers, marketers, designers … His skill was in bringing those people together and keeping them in harmony.

Similarly at Amazon, Jeff Bezos’ skill is bringing talented people together and focusing them on the vision for Amazon.  They work in harmony.  Each does their part for the success of the team, for the success of the company.  It’s called a “service strategy”. He allows employees to assist in creating new and innovative approaches that have a profound impact on the customer experience…. (that’s conducting the orchestra).

Be a magnet for talent.  As managers, team leaders and engaged employees it’s not enough to say that we need to get the right people in our company. We must identify who the right people are and create a process that gets them on board and in the position to succeed.

The process works for both large and small companies.

  1. Identify who the right people are. Each organization and team will have different needs so your “right” people may be different than other companies and teams
  1. Identify several people in your organization who you wish you could clone. Write down their characteristics and traits and create your own benchmark of the right person for each position therefore setting the expectations for all other team members.
  2. Identify the type of person that fits your company and team culture. For example, if you want to create a positive culture make sure you hire positive people. If you want to create a culture that is creative then hire creative people.
  3. If you invest your time, resources and energy to get the right people on board you’ll have less headaches and expenses later on. Take your time during the hiring/recruiting process to make sure you are all on the same path.
  4. Remember, the people you surround yourself with will often determine the kind of company you’re going to be.
  5. Continued training is essential. If you expect your team members to develop their skills and stay on top of changes, don’t get complacent about establishing and updating your training.

Professional athletes put in thousands of hours to sharpen their skills and prepare their bodies for the rigors of their sport.  They are routinely able to overcome the pressure of high stakes moments because they allow their training to take over.   When that happens they can play or perform without worrying about timing or their position.  They are able to perform without “thinking” about what they have to do next.  They work in harmony.

I have trained trainers and employees all over the world and have taught them to believe in themselves and their abilities.  I have written several books to spread the word about service strategies and the effect it has on your company, your employees, your customers and your bottom line.

Join me in spreading the word. The success you will enjoy will be because you have helped other people get what they want.  Plus you will recommit to the people and passions important in your life.

“When you express your passion and enthusiasm, you will become a magnet to others who will be attracted to your high level of energy.  You will become the conductor of the orchestra.” –John Tschohl

John Tschohl

John Tschohl is an international service strategist and speaker. He is founder and president of the Service Quality Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Described by Time and Entrepreneur magazines as a customer service guru, he has written 7 books on customer service including Empowerment, A Way of Life. The Service Quality Institute (http://www.customer-service.com) has developed more than 26 customer service training programs that have been distributed and presented throughout the world. John’s monthly strategic newsletter is available online at no charge. He can also be reached on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

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