A Marketer’s Rallying Cry: Live to Fight Another Day

In sales and marketing, we are subject to highs and lows nearly all the time. Thing are going well, happiness ensues, and we’re not conscious of the time. Things are not going so well, and time slows down. Sometimes it’s hard to find the next prospect. It can be difficult to know where to turn next.

What Can I Handle
Throughout my adult life, when I feel immobilized, I employ catchphrases that spur me on to action. One of these key phrases is “live to fight another day.” What do I mean by live to fight another day? Certainly it has nothing to do with physical combat. It means that if nothing seems to be going well, and I’m in a quandary, I look for what I can handle and can complete in the present.

Suppose I’m feeling lonely or overwhelmed, or simply a have a lack of clarity. I say to myself “live to fight another day” which translates into: I don’t have to necessarily deal with any of those obstacles at the moment as long as I take care of items that need to be handled. This is an antidote to fretting about my current turmoil and to not taking care of other things.

When I complete tasks, around the house or around my office, whether or not I have attained clarity, I feel less overwhelmed and less encumbered by whatever has been weighing on me heavily: I have at least finished these other tasks.

Sunday Afternoon
Suppose it’s a Sunday afternoon, and nothing seems to be going well; I feel as if the world is passing me by, and experience a “dead space” in the middle of the day. I rally myself by thinking, “live to fight another day.” I then look around the house for all the items that need to be tackled.

Are there dishes in the sink? Does the living room needs cleaning? Does the front porch require sweeping? Is anything left undone in the backyard?

Alternatively, I’ll handle accumulated email correspondence, visit web sites that I’ve been intending to visit, or do reading that I’ve saved for the proverbial rainy day.

Following the rallying cry “live to fight another day,” as soon as I engage in one or more of the above activities, I quickly feel better. Once such tasks are completed, maybe I’ll emerge from my mental rut. Maybe not. In either case, I’ve created a clearing for myself because the items I have completed do count for something.

Now, I could call a friend, see a movie, take a walk, open a book, watch a show, cook a dish, or do something that represents the next step. On other days and at other times, other opportunities will unfold. For now, I’m doing what I can, and that’s fine.

Jeff Davidson

Jeff Davidson, the Work Life Balance Expert®, can move an audience like few others. Jeff offers dynamic learning keynotes and seminar presentations.

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